Buccaneer: James Stuart Blackton and the Birth of American Movies (Donald Dewey, 2016)

I don’t as a rule mention the nonfiction books I read here, but I have before and I might as well this time.

This is a biography of J. Stuart Blackton, one of the founders of the pioneering film studio Vitagraph. I should say, the larger part of the book is simply a history of Vitagraph — it spends as much time on Smith, Reader, and Rock as it does Blackton — but I’m not complaining. The focus does shift more to Blackton in the later part, after Warner Bros. takes over the studio and the once millionaire director descends rapidly into poverty, never losing his optimism or delusion that his fortunes are just about to turn.

The trouble with biographies of the Vitagraph founders is that Blackton and Smith were both, depending on your outlook, either tireless self-promoters or bald-faced liars. It’s difficult to untangle fact from fiction in their and their families’ personal versions of the past. This account doesn’t accept Blackton at face-value, but is less cynical than some and takes Blackton’s own words and Trimble’s memories of her father as being broadly speaking true.

Inscriptions: none, it’s brand new.

The Travels of Marco Polo (Marco Polo, c1300)

The people are idolators, use the paper money of the Great Khan, and make silk figured with birds and beasts.

The book is an account of Marco Polo’s travels in Asia and of Kublai Khan’s court. It’s most interesting when he leaves the travelogue for a while to recount some local legend or describe an unusual custom, but the majority of his observations on the various cities he visits are just so, so repetitive.